Moenjodaro Museum & site Tour

Moenjodaro is the cradle of Indus civilization. This pre-historic civilization flourished from the third till the middle of the second millennium B.C, when it mysteriously disappeared. The archeological excavations place Moenjodaro among the most spectacular ancient cities of the world. It had mud-brick and baked-brick buildings, an elaborate covered drainage system with soakpits for disposal bins, a large and imposing building (probably a palace) and citadel mound which incorporates in its margin a system of solid burnt brick towers.

Mohenjo-daro  was one of the largest city-settlements in the Indus Valley Civilization which thrived in ancient times along the Indus River. There are various spellings for the site with different meanings. Mohenjo-daro means the Mound of Mohen or Mohan.  Alternatives are Mohanjo-daro (Mound of Mohan or Krishna), Moenjo-daro (Mound of the Dead), Mohenjodaro or Mohen-jo-daro.  Mohenjo-daro itself is located in Larkana District in the modern-day province of Sindh, Pakistan. Built before 2600 BCE, the city was one of the earliest urban settlements in the world, existing at the same time as the civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Crete. The remains of the city are designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and have been referred to as an “ancient Indus Valley metropolis”.

Mohenjo-daro was built around 2600 BCE and abandoned around 1500 BCE. It was rediscovered in 1922 by Rakhaldas Bandyopadhyay, an officer of the Archaeological Survey of India. He was led to the mound by a Buddhist monk, who believed it to be a stupa. In the 1930s, massive excavations were conducted under the leadership of John Marshall, K. N. Dikshit, Ernest Mackay, and others. John Marshall’s car, which was used by the site directors, is still in the Mohenjo-daro museum, showing their struggle and dedication to Mohenjo-daro. Further excavations were carried out in 1945 by Ahmad Hasan Dani and Mortimer Wheeler.

 Sightseeing Tour

  • Visit Mohenjo-daro Museum and also visit the sites